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Holi Dates: When is Holi in 2019, 2020 and 2021?

Holi 2019

Holi is one of the major festivals of India and is celebrated on different dates every year. This great Indian festival is observed at the end of the winters in the month of March after the full Moon. A day before Holi a large bonfire is lit that helps in burning out the evil spirits and that whole process is called as Holika Dahan.

Holi Celebration Date 2019

Holi: 21st March 2019
Holika Dahan: 20th March 2019

Holi Celebration Date 2020

Holi: 10th March 2020
Holika Dahan: 09th March 2020

Holi Celebration Date 2021

Holi: 29th March 2021
Holika Dahan: 28th March 2021
Detailed information on Holi Dates
Timing: It is highly prohibited to perform the bonfire of the Holika Dahan before the Sunset as that can be not really be the cause for bringing in a lot of misfortune in life. It must be performed on a specific time on the Purnima Tithi only after the Sunset. It is very important to choose a good Muhurat in order to perform the ritual of Holika Dahan. Ideally it must be performed on Pradosh Kaal when the night and day are believed to meet each other.
It is prohibited to perform the ritual of Holika Dahan until the Bhadra Tithi. Also, the the exact time for the same varies from state to state all over in India.
Perfect Timing for 2019 Holika Dahan:
In Mumbai - 20:55 to 21:11
In Delhi – 20:52 to 24:30
On the day of Holika dahan, a special type of Puja has to be performed so as to keep children and the other family members in good of the health and keep away from them all types of evils.
The celebration of Holika Dahan is carried out in order in the remembrance of the Holika. In an attempt to fulfil the wish of her demon brother Holika tried to sit in the fire and burn him as he worshipped Lord Vishnu and not her brother. As she had that blessing of not getting affected by the fire so she sat with Prahalada in the fire. But, because of the great devotion of Prahalada, he was saved and Holika was burnt to death.
On the day of Holi, people enjoy by splashing colors over each other and they also play with liquid colors. This part of playing with colours goes on till the end of the afternoon and from the evening people start off with preparing delicious meals.
Also in various parts of the country Holi is celebrated in different way and with different names.
Holi celebration in Vrindavan and Mathura
Holi celebration in Vrindavan is a week-long celebration and that it starts with the Phoolon wali Holi that starts by splashing flowers at the Banke Bihari temple in Vrindavan during Aanola Ekadasi at 4 p.m. The week-long celebration of Holi Vrindavan will be starting on 26th of February 2018. The celebration will be concluding of 1st of March 2018 which is the day before Holi celebration when people throw colors over each other. During afternoon the celebration starts in Mathura at around 3 p.m.
Lathmar Holi
There is the tradition of beating up the men by women in the village of Nandgaon and Barsana which is performed a week before the Holi celebration. Lathmar Holi in 2019:
In Barsana – 16th March
In Nandgaon – 17th March
So go ahead mark the Holi date 2019 in your personal calendar and start preparing for Holi 2019!!
Holi 2019
Thursday, March 21, 2019
HOLI CALENDAR 2019
MARCH 2019
SMTWTFS
12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31

Holi 2018
Friday, March 2, 2018
HOLI CALENDAR 2018
MARCH 2018
SMTWTFS
123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Holi 2017
Monday, March 13, 2017
HOLI CALENDAR 2017
MARCH 2017
SMTWTFS
1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031

Holi 2016
Thursday, March 24, 2016
HOLI CALENDAR 2016
MARCH 2016
SMTWTFS
12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031

Holi 2015
Friday, March 6, 2015
HOLI CALENDAR 2015
MARCH 2015
SMTWTFS
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031

  


Holi 2014
Monday, March 17, 2014
HOLI CALENDAR 2014
MARCH 2014
SMTWTFS
1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031


Holi 2013
Wednesday, March 27, 2013
HOLI CALENDAR 2013
MARCH 2013
SMTWTFS
12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31



Holi 2012
Thursday, March 8, 2012
HOLI CALENDAR 2012
MARCH 2012
SMTWTFS
123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031


Holi 2011
Saturday, March 19, 2011
HOLI CALENDAR 2011
MARCH 2011
SMTWTFS
12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031


Holi 2010
Monday, March 01, 2010
HOLI CALENDAR 2010
MARCH 2010
SMTWTFS
123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031

Happy Holi 2019

Holi is a most colorful festival of World, it's festival Love and Unity. Wishes are the most important in our life. On this occasion, huge numbers of peoples search the latest collection of Happy Holi 2019 Wishes. If you are searching wishes for sending your friends to the Holi Special Wishes, Happy Holi 2019 Quotes, So you are in right place. You can select any wishes and send to all friends Happy Holi.
 May the colours of Holi make your life as colourful and happy as they are. ― Wish you a very Happy Holi

 The festival of love, joy, and happiness has arrived. Celebrate the festival with lots of colours, water balloons and tempting sweets. Happy Holi!! 

 May the shines of this Holi brighten your path towards progress and continued success. ― Happy Holi! 

 Hope you smile always and your friends paint you with every color of happiness. ― Happy Holi! 

 All the colors of Holi remind me of your smile. I hope you will enjoy this Holi with smile. ― Happy Holi! 

 Holi is a special time of year to remember those who are close to our hearts with splashing colors! ― Happy Holi!

The Story of Holi Festival: The festival of Holi is celebrated on the day after the full moon in early March every year. It is also known as the Festival of Colors. Holi celebrates spring, fertility, good harvests, and the return of bright colors after the drabness of winter. There are many stories of the origin of Holi. Some involve the demon King Hiranyakashyap and his sister, Holika, and son, Prahlad. Other legends associated with the festival include the legend of Shiva and Kaamadeva and those of Ogress Dhundhi and Pootana.



Final Words

Holi is one of the major festivals of Hindus. It is celebrated in many parts of India, but especially in the north of India. 
The festival is celebrated for two to three days. People pour colored water on each other and cook many types of sweets and other food. Holi is celebrated in spring season because it is welcoming spring. They believe spring is full of colors so they throw colored water on each other. The other day is celebrated with wonderful colors to mark the victory of asset and goodness over iniquity. Buenos Dias

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We have different types of Happy Holi Wishes, which you send many people’s like a family member, friends, close one etc. All knows many people search Holi Quotes, You can see the beautiful collection of Happy Holi 2019 Quotes, Happy Holi Wishes, Happy Holi 2019 Messages, Happy Holi Quotes, which you like most and send to many peoples some sweet lines which easily show your feeling and Don’t forget to Share.

Holi celebration in Mathura, India, Asia
Hira Punjabi/Getty Images

When is Holi in 2019, 2020 and 2021?

The date of Holi is different every year in India! In most of India, Holi is celebrated at the end of winter, on the day after the full moon in March each year. On the eve of Holi, large bonfires are lit to mark occasion and to burn evil spirits. This is known as Holika Dahan.
  • In 2019, Holi is on March 21, with Holika Dahan on March 20. More information.
  • In 2020, Holi is on March 10, with Holika Dahan on March 9.
  • In 2021, Holi is on March 29, with Holika Dahan on March 28.
However, in the states of West Bengal and Odisha, the Holi festival is celebrated as Dol Jatra or Dol Purnima, on the same day as Holika Dahan. Similar to Holi, the Dol Jatra celebrations are dedicated to Lord Krishna. However, the mythology is different.

Holi Dates Detailed Information

  • The Timing of Holika Dahan -- According to Hindu scriptures, the lighting and worship of the bonfires must be performed at a specific period (muhurta) after sunset on Purnima Tithi (the full moon lunar day), otherwise it will bring great misfortune. Choosing the right muhurta for the Holika Dahan ritual is particularly important, more so than for any other Hindu festival ritual. Ideally, Holika Dahan should be carried out during the auspicious occasion of Pradosh Kaal, when day and night meet (which starts from the time of sunset). However, it mustn't be done until Bhadra Tithi is over. The exact muhurta for Holika Dahan in India will vary depending on the location and time of sunset. For example, for 2019, astrologers have calculated it to be between 8.57 p.m. to 9.09 p.m. in Mumbai. In Delhi, it's 8.57 p.m. to 12.28 a.m. It starts late due to the presence of Bhadra Mukha, which will bring misfortune.
  • In the afternoon, before the bonfire is lit, a special puja is performed to keep children healthy and safe from evil influences. This comes from the story about Holika in the Hindu text, the Narada Purana. Holika attempted to carry out her demon king brother's wish to burn his son Prahlad in the fire because Prahlad worshiped Lord Vishnu instead of him. It was believed that Holika couldn't be harmed by fire, so she sat in it while holding the child. However, she was charred to death and Prahlad was saved due to his devotion to Lord Vishnu, who protected him.
  • On Holi, people will usually spend the morning throwing colored powder and water on each other. These celebrations die down by the afternoon. There are no rituals that need to be performed.
  • Lathmar Holi -- The women of Barsana and Nandgaon villages, near Mathura in Uttar Pradesh, beat up men with sticks in the week before Holi. In 2019, Lathmar Holi will take place on March 15 in Barsana and March 16 in Nandgaon.
  • Holi in Mathura and Vrindavan -- Week-long Holi celebrations at Banke Bihari temple in Vrindavan commence with the throwing of flowers (Phoolon Wali Holi) at 4 p.m. on Aanola Ekadashi, which is March 17, 2019. (It only lasts for about 20 minutes, so be on time or you'll miss it). The festivities at Vrindavan conclude on March 20, 2019 (the day before Holi) with the throwing of colors in the morning. In the afternoon, the action moves onto Mathura, where there's a colorful Holi procession at about 3 p.m. Plus, the throwing of colors the next day.

More About Holi

Find out more about the meaning of Holi and how it's celebrated in this Essential Guide to Holi Festivaland see pictures in this Holi Festival Photo Gallery.
Visiting India during Holi? Check out these Top Places to Celebrate Holi in India.

Holi 2019 Date: When is Holi in 2019?

Holi 2019 Date in India Calendar: A symbol of triumph of good over evil, Holi marks the onset of spring. This year, the festival of colours will be celebrated on March 20 and March 21.

Holi 2019 Date in India Calendar:  Celebrated by Hindus every year, on the day of Purnima (the full moon), in the month of Falgun over two consecutive days — the first day of Holi is known as Chhoti Holi or Holika Dahan and the second as Rangwali Holi, Dhuleti, Dhulandi or Dhulivandan. This year, the festival of colours will be celebrated on March 20 and 21.
A symbol of triumph of good over evil, Holi marks the onset of spring and is also celebrated to show gratitude for a good harvest.
SIGNIFICANCE
On the eve of Holi,a large bonfire, termed as holika dahan, is lit. People gather around the fire known as Chhoti Holi and perform ‘pingpuja’ while praying for the longevity and prosperity of their loved ones.
On the second day of celebrations known as Rangpanchami, people play with colours. It is believed that Krishna used to celebrate the festival with colours at Vrindavan and Gokul.
At some places, people also form a human pyramid and break a pot full of buttermilk hung at a considerable height.
HISTORY
One of the most popular legends is the story of Hiranyakashyap who was a demon king and wanted to be immortal. While he wanted everyone to worship him as god, his son Prahlada was a devotee of Vishnu and this used to offend him. Once he asked his sister, who had a divine shawl that could not catch fire, to sit on raging flames with Prahlad in her lap. But Lord Vishnu, impressed by Prahlad’s devotion, killed both Hiranyakashyap and his sister.
Another legend of Holi celebrations that is extremely popular in south India is that of Lord Shiva and Kaamadeva. It is believed Kaamadeva, the god of passion, awoke Shiva from his deep meditation so he could save the world.

Holi in India

Holi is one of the major festival of India and is the most vibrant of all. The joys of Holi knows no bound. The festival is celebrated across the four corners of India or rather across the globe. The festival is filled with so much fun and frolic that the very mention of the word 'Holi' draws smile and enthusiasm amongst the people. Holi also celebrates the arrival of Spring, a season of joy and hope.
Legend of Holi Festival
Holi is one of the oldest festivals of India. There are many interesting stories associated with the festival's origin as one moves across the different states from North to South and East to West. Paintings and scriptures depict the roots of the festival. Mythology plays a very important part in narrating the festival of Holi. The most popular stories of Holi origin relates to 'Holika Dahan' and Legend of Radha-Krishan.
Story of Holika
Integrally entwined with Holi, is the tradition of 'Holika Dahan', which is actually lighting of bonfires. The ritual is symbolic of victory of good over evil and has its root in the legend of demon king Hiranyakashyap who wished to end his blessed son, Prahlad's life with the help of his sister, Holika who burnt in the fir and no harm occurred to Prahlad. Since then the day is celebrated in victory of good over bad.
Story of Radha and Krishan
The legend of Radha and Krishna is closely linked with this tradition of colors on Holi. Young Krishna, who had a dark complexion was jealous of his beloved Radha's extremely fair skin. In a mischievous mood, he applied color on Radha's face. Following this ancient legend, lovers till date long to color their beloved as an expression of love.
Holi Celebrations in India
Holi is famous as Basant Utsav in rural India. It is one of the major festivals in India and is celebrated with extreme enthusiasm and joy. Gulal, abeer and pichkaris are synonymous with the festival. Elaborate plans are made to color the loved ones. Everybody wants to be the first one to color the other. In the ensuing battle of colors, everybody is drowned not just in colors of gulal but also in love and mirth. People love to drench others and themselves in colored water. Gujiyas and other sweets are offered to everyone who comes across to color.
Temples are beautifully decorated at the time of Holi. Idol of Radha is placed on swings and devotees turn the swings singing devotional Holi songs. Now-a-days small plays are organized reflecting the spirit of the festival.
What is remarkably same across the country is the spirit of Holi. Fun, frolic, boisterousness to the extent of buffoonery marks this festival of colors. What more can be expected- when the people get a social sanction to get intoxicated on the bhang, open not just their hearts' out but also their lungs. And viola, nobody is expected to take offense too, as the norm of the day is, 'Bura na mano Holi hai'.
Holi in Andhra Pradesh
Though the celebrations of Holi in South India are not as grand as compared to that in North India. Yet, what is particularly noticeable in Andhra Pradesh as in other Dravidian states is the heightened feeling of communal harmony... more
Holi in Assam
Holi is one of the most popular festivals celebrated in India.A day when every age group comes together in wake of joy to spread colours and happiness all around!...more
Holi in Bengal
Their is a particular elan in the way Holi is celebrated in the state of Bengal. The panache is added by the presence of the rich Bengal culture and the existence of Shantiniketan... more

Holi in Bhil Tribes of North West India
The Bhils in Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh have their own special way to mark the festival. It is interesting to note that these tribes have retailed many of their pre-Hindu customs... more

Holi in Barsana
Holi of Barsana -a village, 42 kms away from Mathura, UP and the birthplace of Radha is of particular interest. Here, men from Nandgaon-the land of Krishna come to play Holi with the girls of Barsana... more 

Holi in Bihar
The Holi is celebrated with the same fervour and charm in this state as in rest of north India. Here too, the legend of Holika is prevalent. On the eve of Phalgun Poornima, Biharis light bonfires... more
Holi in Chhattisgarh
Indian festivals are popular all around the world. Holi is among one of well-known occasions celebrated with joy during the month of March. This month is also called as the time of Faagun....more
Holi in Delhi
Delhi being the capital and the heart of India, celebrates Holi with extreme enthusiasm - even to the extent of boisterousness. 
Being a metro city, an amalgamation of cultures and traditions can be witnessed here... more

Holi in Goa
The energetic people of Goa do not lag behind the rest of the country when it comes to Holi celebrations. The festival of spring is called Shigmo in Goa. The festival is celebrated mostly by the masses following all religious traditions... more

Holi in Gujarat
The vibrant Gujarat reverberates with the chants of the folk song-'Govinda ala re, zara matki sambhal Brijbala..'. People, specially the youth of the state are high on the spirit of the festival... more

Holi in Haryana
Holi assumes an entirely new colour in this state and gets its new name,'Dulandi Holi'... more

Holi in Himachal Pradesh
This festival is celebrated in much the same way as rest of North India. They light bonfires-fires called Holika which is symbolic of victory of good over evil... more

Holi in Jammu and Kashmir
Jammu and Kashmir lays in the north most portion of India. This place has extreme cold weather during initial months of every year. Often accompanied by snow fall and shivering cold weather... more

Holi in Jharkhand
Jharkhand, which means “bush land”, is the 28th state of India. It was formed from the southern part of the state of Bihar. Odisha, Uttar Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and West Bengal are the states which lie... more

Holi in Karnataka
Holi is one of the most famous festivals of India which in most parts of the country is played by hurling colours on each other, eating delicious meals, dancing and singing on some music themed on Holi.... more

Holi in Kerala
Holi is not celebrated in most Southern part, with the zeal same as can be seen in the Northern part of the country. It is not as admired in states which fall under the southern belt, as by the people of the Northern states.... more

Holi in Madhya Pradesh
Revelry is no less in this state and same level of enthusiasm can be witness amongst the citizens of this state as in the rest of North... more



Holi in Maharashtra
Maharashtrians have their own grand style of celebrating Holi. Besides other things, not to be missed is their mouthwatering delicacy - Puranpoli... more

Holi in Manipur
It is interesting to note how Holi is celebrated in this part of the country. Here, the festivities continue for six days starting on the full moon day of Phalguna... more

Holi in Mathura-Vrindavan
People from all corners of India, rather, world gather here every year to feel the essence of Holi in the land of Krishna... more
Holi in Nagaland
Each festival in an Indian calendar brings people of the country together. Surprisingly, no matter to which caste or religion it pertains, the joy of celebratingis equal in everyone’s heart... more

Holi in Orissa
The tradition followed in Orissa is quite similar to that of Bengal with only minor region specific changes... more

Holi in Puducherry
The best fact about India and its people is that everyone loves to stay together. This is why all the centric occasions like Holi are played all over the country including the Pondicherry state... more

Holi in Punjab
Known for their love for life, Sikhs celebrate Holi in their own style and elan. Here, they call it 'Hola Mohalla'.... more

Holi in Rajasthan
This colourful state plays Holi much the same way as Mathura. The night before the full moon, crowds of people gather together and light huge bonfires to burn the residual dried leaves and twigs of the winter... more

Holi in Uttar Pradesh
Celebrations in UP are not just restricted to Mathura and Vrindavan. Rather, every nook and corner of the state gets wrapped in the multitude hues of the Holi... more

Holi in Tamil Nadu 
The Tamilians celebrate Holi around the legend of Kama Deva. On this day, songs are sung that tell the pathetic tale of Rati and her lamentations... more

Holi in Uttrakhand
Holi is one of the most loved festivals of India when people forget all the enmities and resentments and come together to spread colour in each other’s lives... more

Holi in Jaipur
India is a diverse country with people from a diverse culture residing here and celebrating festivals of all kinds. There are numerous festivals that are celebrated by people all over India irrespective... more

Holi In Anandpur Sahib
Anandpur Sahib is a sanctified city of the Sikhs. To many people, it is as important as Amritsar although it is a distant city. It is situated in the Rupnagar district of Punjab. It is 81.3 KM away from Chandigarh.... more

Holi in Mathura and Vrindavan
The festival of colours spreads happiness and vibrancy all over the world when it arrives. Indians across the world wait for Holi, for days to skip past the monotonous schedule and fill the lives up with colours and joy... more

Join Mumbaikars Holi Revelry & Fun 2019
The glorious festival of Holi brings with it lots of thrill and excitement. Mumbaikars also experience joyous delight when it comes to the gala Holi celebrations. Be it famous Bollywood personalities or popular socialites... more

Holi Celebrations at The Dwarkadhish Temple at Mathura
Holi is one of the most vibrant and colourful amongst all the Indian festivals. The celebration of Holi takes place in almost every part of India. Holi marks the end of winter and welcomes the fruitful season of spring with all its fullness.... more

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